Bibliography

From Girl to Goddess

  1. Adovasio, J.M., Olga Soffer, and Jake Page. The Invisible Sex. New York: HarperCollins, 2007.
  2. Aeschylus. Eumenides. Loeb Classical Library 145 & 146, translated by Herbert Weir Smyth. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 1926.The Theoi Project, <http://www.theoi.com/ Text/AeschylusEumenides.html>.
  3. _____. Prometheus Bound. Loeb Classical Library 145 & 146, translated by Herbert Weir Smyth Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, 1926.The Theoi Project, <http://www.theoi.com/Text/AeschylusPrometheus.html>.
  4. Agha-Jaffar, Tamara. Women and Goddesses in Myth and Sacred Text. New York: Pearson Education, 2005.
  5. Allen, Paula Gunn. Grandmothers of the Light: A Medicine Woman’s Sourcebook. Boston: Beacon, 1991.
  6. “The Alphabet of Ben Sira,” in Rabbinic Fantasies: Imaginative Narratives from Classical Hebrew Literature Yale Judaica Series, edited by Professor David Stern and Mark Jay Mirsky, 167–202. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1998.
  7. Andersen, Hans Christian. Hans Christian Andersen:The Complete Fairy Tales and Stories, translated by Erik Christian Haugaard. New York: Anchor, 1983.
  8. Apte, Mahadeo L. Humor and Laughter: An Anthropological Approach. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1985.
  9. Apuleius. “Cupid and Psyche,” in The Golden Ass, translated by Robert Graves. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1951.
  10. _____. Cupid and Psyche, translated by E.J. Kenney. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.
  11. Arabian Nights’ Entertainments or The Thousand and One Nights, translated by Edward William Lane. New York: Tudor, 1944.
  12. Ashe, Geoffrey. The Virgin Mary’s Cult, and the Reemergence of the Sacred. New York: Arkana, 1988.
  13. Ashley, Mike, ed. The Giant Book of Myths and Legends. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1995.
  14. Ashliman, D.L. A Guide to Folktales in the English Language. New York: Greenwood, 1987.
  15. _____. “Incest in Indo-European Folktales.” Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts, 1997, <http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/incest.html>.
  16. Augustine. “Literal Commentary on Genesis,” in Women in the Early Church: Messages of the Fathers of the Church, edited by Elizabeth A. Clark, 28–29. Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1983.
  17. Barchers, Suzanne I. Wise Women: Folk and Fairy Tales from Around the World. Colorado: Libraries Unlimited, 1990.
  18. Barnard, Mary, trans. Sappho: A New Translation. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1958.
  19. Barrette, Elizabeth. “Erishkegal: Goddess of Thankless Tasks.” SageWoman 31 (Autumn 1995). <http://www.worthlink.net/~ysabet/spirit/erishkegal>.
  20. Basso, Ellen B. In Favor of Deceit: A Study of Tricksters in an Amazonian Society. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1987.
  21. Beck, Brenda, Peter Claus, Goswami Praphulladatta, and Jawaharlal Handoo, eds. Folktales of India. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987.
  22. Beckwith, Martha. Hawaiian Mythology. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1940.
  23. Benedict, Ruth M. Zuni Mythology. New York: AMS, 1960.
  24. Bettelheim, Bruno. The Uses of Enchantment. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1977.
  25. Bierhorst, John. Latin American Folktales: Stories from Hispanic and Indian Traditions. New York: Pantheon, 2002.
  26. Bierlein, J.F. Parallel Myths. New York: Ballantine, 1994.
  27. Bly, Robert, and Marion Woodman. The Maiden King. New York: Henry Holt, 1998.
  28. Bogan, Louise. “Medusa,” in The Blue Estuaries: Poems 1923–1968, 4. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1968.
  29. Bolen, Jean Shinoda. Goddesses in Everywoman. New York: Quill, 2004.
  30. Book of Leinster, The, edited and translated by Douglas Hyde. The CELT Project: Corpus of Electronic Texts, <http:www.ucc.ie/celt>.
  31. Botkin, B.A. A Treasury of Mississippi River Folklore. New York: Bonanza, 1978.
  32. Bottigheimer, Ruth B., ed. Fairy Tales and Society. Philadelphia: University of Philadelphia Press, 1986.
  33. _____. “Fertility Control and the Birth of the Modern European Fairy Tale Heroine.” Marvels and Tales: Journal of Fairy Tale Studies 14, no. 1 (2000): 64–79.
  34. Bowra, C.M. Greek Lyric Poetry. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1936.
  35. Brant, Beth Deganwadonti. Mohawk Trail. Ithaca, NY: Firebrand, 1985.
  36. Briffault, Robert. The Mothers. New York and London: Macmillan, 1927.
  37. Brown, Judith C. Immodest Acts. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.
  38. Brunel, Pierre. Companion to Literary Myths, Heroes, and Archetypes, translated by Wendy Allatson, Judith Hayward, and Trista Selous. New York: Routledge, 1992.
  39. Budge, E.A. Wallis, ed. and trans. Legends of the Gods: The Egyptian Texts. London: Kegan Paul, Trench and Trübner, 1912.
  40. Bulfinch, Thomas. The Golden Age of Myth and Legend. Hertfordshire, UK: Wordsworth Editions, 1993.
  41. Bushnaq, Inea, ed. and trans. Arab Folktales. New York: Pantheon, 1986.
  42. Caldecott, Moyra. Women in Celtic Myth. Rochester, VT: Destiny, 1988.
  43. Cameron, Anne. Daughters of Copper Woman. Vancouver, BC: Press Gang, 1981.
  44. Campbell, Joseph. The Hero with a Thousand Faces Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1973.
  45. _____. The Masks of God: Creative Mythology. New York: Viking Penguin, 1968.
  46. _____. The Masks of God: Oriental Mythology. New York: Viking Penguin, 1962.
  47. _____. Pathways to Bliss: Mythology and Personal Transformation, edited by David Kudler. Novato, CA: New World Library, 2004.
  48. Campbell, Joseph, with Bill Moyers. The Power of Myth, edited by Betty Sue Flowers. New York: Doubleday, 1988.
  49. Canaanite Myths and Legends, translated by G.R. Driver, edited by J.C.L. Gibson. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1977.
  50. Caputi, Jane. Gossips, Gorgons, and Crones. Santa Fe: Bear, 1993.
  51. Carter, Angela. The Bloody Chamber. New York: Penguin, 1990.
  52. Cashford, Jules, Anne Baring, and Laurens Van Der Post. The Myth of the Goddess: Evolution of an Image. London and New York: Arkana, 1993.
  53. Cassuto, Umberto. The Goddess Anat, translated by Israel Abrahams. Jerusalem: The Magnes Press, 1971.
  54. Chamoiseau, Patrick. Creole Folktales, translated by Linda Coverdale. New York: The New Press, 1994.
  55. Chesler, Phyllis. Women & Madness. New York: Avon, 1972.
  56. Chia, Mantak, and Michael Winn. Taoist Secrets of Love: Cultivating Male Sexual Energ y. Santa Fe: Aurora, 1984.
  57. Chinen, Allan B. Waking the World: Classic Tales of Women and the Heroic Feminine. New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher, 1996.
  58. Christ, Carol P. “Why Women Need the Goddess,” in Womanspirit Rising: A Feminist Reader in Religion, edited by C. Christ and J. Plaskow, 273–87. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1979.
  59. Christen, Kimberly A. Clowns and Tricksters: An Encyclopedia of Tradition and Culture. Denver, CO: ABC-CLIO, 1998.
  60. Christiansen, Reidar, ed. Folktales of Norway, translated by Pat Shaw Iversen. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968.
  61. Clark, Ella E. Indian Legends of the Pacific Northwest. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1953.
  62. Clement of Alexandria. Athenians and the Rest of Greece, translated by G.W. Butterworth. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1919.
  63. Coffin, Tristram Potter. The Female Hero in Folklore and Legend. New York: Seabury Press, 1975.
  64. Cohen, Betsy. The Snow White Syndrome. New York: Berkley, 1989.
  65. Condren, Mary. The Serpent and the Goddess. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1989.
  66. Courlander, Harold. The Fourth World of the Hopis. New York: Crown, 1971.
  67. Crane, Thomas Frederick. Italian Popular Tales. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1885. SurLaLune Fairytales, <http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/authors/crane>.
  68. Culpepper, Emily Erwin. “Gorgons: A Face for Contemporary Women’s Rage,” Woman of Power 3 Winter/Spring (1986): 22–25.
  69. Curtin, Jeremiah. Myth and Folk Tales of the Russians, Western Slavs, and Magyars. New York: Benjamin Blom, 1971.
  70. Davids, Rhys, trans. Psalms of the Early Buddhists. London: Oxford University Press, 1909.
  71. Davidson, Hilda Ellis. Roles of the Northern Goddess. London & New York: Routledge, 1998.
  72. de Beauvoir, Simone. The Second Sex. New York: Bantam Books, 1970.
  73. “Descent of the Goddess Ishtar into the Lower World,” in The Civilization of Babylonia and Assyria, edited by M. Jastrow. Philadelphia and London: J.B. Lippincott, 1915.
  74. “Devî Gita.” In Srimad Devî Bhagavatam, translated by Swami Vijnanananda. India: Hari Prasanna Chatterji, 1921. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/hin/dg>.
  75. Devi-mahatmyam, edited by Swami Jagadiswaranand. Madras: Sri Ramakrishna Math, 1969.
  76. Dexter, Miriam Robbins. Whence the Goddesses: A Source Book. New York: Pergamon, 1990.
  77. Dinnerstein, Dorothy. The Mermaid and the Minotaur. New York: Other Press, 1999.
  78. Douglas, Susan J. Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female with the Mass Media. New York: Crown, 1994.
  79. Downing, Charles. Armenian Folk-tales and Fables. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.
  80. Dudbridge, Glen. The Legend of Miao-shan. London: Ithaca, 1978.
  81. Dundes, Alan, ed. Cinderella, a Casebook. New York: Wildman, 1983.
  82. Dunn, Joseph, ed. The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Táin Bó Cúalnge. London: David Nutt, 1914. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/cool/index.htm>.
  83. Eisler, Riane. The Chalice and the Blade. New York: HarperOne, 1988.
  84. Emerson, Nathaniel B. Pele and Hi’iaka: a Myth from Hawaii. Honolulu: Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 1915.
  85. Enuma Elish: The Epic of Creation. In The Seven Tablets of Creation, translated by L.W. King. London: Luzac, 1902. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/ane/stc>.
  86. The Epic of Gilgamesh, translated by Maureen Gallery Kovacs. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1985.
  87. Erodoes, Richard, and Alfonzo Ortiz, eds. American Indian Myths and Legends. New York: Pantheon, 1984.
  88. Estés, Clarissa Pinkola. Women Who Run with the Wolves. New York: Ballantine, 1992.
  89. Euripides. “Bacchae,” in The Tragedies of Euripides, translated by T.A. Buckley. London:
  90. Henry G. Bohn, 1850. The Perseus Digital Library Project, <http://www.perseus.tufts.edu>.
  91. _____. “Medea,” in Euripides, translated by David Kovacs. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. The Perseus Digital Library Project, <http://www.perseus.tufts.edu>.
  92. Evslin, Bernard. Gods, Demigods & Demons: An Encyclopedia of Greek Mythology. New York: Scholastic, 1975.
  93. Farrer, Claire R. Women and Folklore: Images and Genres. Illinois: Waveland, 1975.
  94. Feldman, Susan, ed. The Story-Telling Stone: Traditional Native American Myths and Tales. New York: Dell, 1965.
  95. Fowke, Edith. Tales Told in Canada. Toronto: Doubleday Canada, 1986.
  96. Frankel, Hans H. The Flowering Plum and the Palace Lady: Interpretations of Chinese Poetry. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1976.
  97. Freud, Sigmund. A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis. New York: Routledge, Chapman and Hall, 1969.
  98. _____. “Medusa’s Head,” in Collected Papers, Vol. 5, 105–6. London: Hogarth, 1953.
  99. _____. Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Vol. 9, translated by James Strachey, edited by Anna Freud et al. London: Hogarth, 1959.
  1. Friday, Nancy. My Mother/My Self: The Daughter’s Search for Identity. New York: Delacorte, 1977.
  2. Friedan, Betty. The Fountain of Age. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993.
  3. Gadon, Elinor W. The Once and Future Goddess. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1989.
  4. Geha, Richard. “For the Love of Medusa.” Psychoanalytic Review 62, no. 1 (1975).
  5. Geoffrey Ashe. The Virgin: Mary’s Cult, and the Reemergence of the Sacred. New York: Arkana, 1988.
  6. George, Demetra. Mysteries of the Dark Moon: The Healing Power of the Dark Goddess. New York: HarperCollins, 1992.
  7. _____. “Mysteries of the Dark Moon.” Woman of Power 1 no. 8 (Winter 1988): 30–34.
  8. Gernant, Karen. Imagining Women: Fujian Folktales. New York: Interlink, 1995.
  9. Gilgamesh, translated by R. Campbell Thompson. London: Luzac, 1928. The Internet Sacred Texts Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/ane/eog/index.htm>.
  1. Gill, the Rev. William Wyatt. Myths and Songs from the South Pacific. London: Henry S. King, 1876.
  2. Gimbutas, Marija. The Language of the Goddess. San Francisco: HarperCollins, 1989.
  3. Girardot, N.J. “Initiation and Meaning in the Tale of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” Journal of American Folklore (1977): 90.
  4. Gluck, Sherna. “What’s So Special about Women? Women’s Oral His-tory.” Frontiers 2, no. 2 1977: 3–17.
  5. Golden Goddess, The: Ancient Egyptian Love Lyrics, translated by Raymond A. McCoy. Menomonie, WI: Enchiridion, 1972.
  6. Golston, Sydele E. Changing Woman of the Apache: Women’s Lives in Past and Present. Danbury, CT: Grolier, 1996.
  7. Gould, Joan. Spinning Straw into Gold. New York: Random House, 2005.
  8. Grahn, Judy. “Strange Country This: Lesbianism and North American Indian Tribes.” Journal of Homosexuality 12, no. 3 (1985): 53.
  9. Graves, Robert. The Greek Myths, Vol. 1. New York: Penguin, 1955.
  10. Grimm, Jacob, and Wilhelm. “Die Weiber zu Weinsperg,” in Deutsche Sagen, Vol. 2, no. 481, 180, translated by D.L. Ashliman. Berlin: In der Nicolaischen Buchhandlung, 1818. <http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0875ast.html>.
  1. Grimm Brothers. Grimms’ Fairy Tales. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1970.
  2. Haarmann, H. “The Kinship of the Virgin Mary: Profile of a Cultural Archetype.” ReVision 20, no. 3 (1998): 17–24.
  3. Hall, Nor. The Moon and the Virgin: Reflections on the Archetypal Feminine. New York: Harper & Row, 1980.
  4. Halliwell, James Orchard. The Nursery Rhymes of England. London, 1853. Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts, <http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0510b.html>.
  5. Hamilton, Edith. Mytholog y: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes. New York: New American Library, 1940.
  6. Harding, M. Esther. The Way of All Women. New York: Putnam’s, for the C.G. Jung Foundation for Analytic Psychology, 1970.
  7. _____. Women’s Mysteries Ancient and Modern. New York: Harper & Row, 1971.
  8. Harrison, Jane Ellen. Prolegomena to the Study of Greek Religion. London: Merlin, 1962.
  9. Harvey, Andrew, and Anne Baring. The Divine Feminine. Berkeley, CA: Conari, 1996.
  10. Hawley, John S., and Donna M. Wulff, eds. Devi: Goddesses of India. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1996.
  11. Hennessy, W.M. “The Ancient Irish Goddess of War.” Revue Celtique 1 (1870): 32–37. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/aigw/aigw01.htm>.
  1. Herodotus. The Histories, translated by Henry Cary. New York: D. Appleton, 1899.
  2. Hesiod. Theogony, translated by Hugh G. Evelyn-White. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1914. Perseus Digital Library Project, edited by Gregory R. Crane, 2008, Tufts University, <http://www.perseus.tufts.edu>.
  1. _____. Works & Days, translated by Hugh G. Evelyn-White. The Theoi Project, edited by Aaron J. Atsma, 2008, <http://www.theoi.com/Heroine/Pandora>.
  2. Heyob, Sharon Kelly. The Cult of Isis among Women in the Graeco-Roman World. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1975.
  3. Higginson, Thomas Wentworth. “Sappho.” Atlantic Monthly ( July 1871). Early Women Masters East and West, <http://www.earlywomenmasters.net/essays/authors/higginson/twh_sappho.html>.
  1. Hirschfield, Jane, ed. Women in Praise of the Sacred. New York: Harper Perennial, 1995.
  2. Homer. “Hymn to Aphrodite,” translated by Hugh G. Evelyn-White. Perseus Digital Library Project, edited by Gregory R. Crane, 2008, Tufts University, <http://www.perseus.tufts.edu>.
  3. _____. “Hymn to Demeter,” translated by Hugh G. Evelyn-White. Perseus Digital Library Project, edited by Gregory R. Crane, 2008, Tufts University, <http://www.perseus.tufts.edu>.
  4. _____. “To Earth the Mother of All,” translated by Hugh G. Evelyn-White. Perseus Digital Library Project, edited by Gregory R. Crane, 2008, Tufts University, <http://www.perseus.tufts.edu>.
  5. _____. The Iliad of Homer & The Odyssey, translated by Samuel Butler, edited by Robert Maynard Hutchins, in Great Books of the Western World 4. Chicago: Encyclopedia Britannica, 1952, 1989.
  6. Hurston, Zora Neale. Mules and Men. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1935.
  7. Husain, Shahrukh. The Goddess. Boston: Little, Brown, 1997.
  8. Huston, Nancy. “The Matrix of War: Mothers and Heroes,” in The Female Body in Western Culture, edited by Susan Rubin Suleiman, 119–36. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1986.
  9. Huysmans, Joris-Karl. À Rebours, translated by Robert Bladick. New York: Penguin, 2003.
  10. Hyde, Lewis. Trickster Makes This World. Farrar, Straus, and Giroux: New York, 1998.
  11. Hyginus, Gaius Julius. Astronomica, translated by Mary Grant. The Theoi Classical E-Texts Library, 2.13, <http://www.theoi.com/Text/HyginusFabulae1.html>.
  12. “Inana’s Descent to the Nether World,” edited by J.A. Black, G. Cunningham, E. Fluckiger-Hawker, et al. The Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature, The ETCSL Project. Oxford: University of Oxford, 2006, <http://www-etcsl.orient.ox.ac.uk>.
  13. Irizar, Luis de Barandiaran, ed. A View from the Witch’s Cave: Folktales of the Pyrenees, translated by Linda White. Reno, Nevada: University of Nevada Press, 1991.
  14. Jacobs, Joseph. English Fairy Tales. London: David Nutt, 1890. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/eft/>.
  15. Jacobs, S., W. Thomas, and S. Lang, eds. Twospirit People: Native American Gender Identity, Sexuality, and Spirituality. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1997.
  16. John of Damascus. “Sermon 1,” Three Sermons on the Dormition of the Virgin. The Internet Medieval Sourcebook, edited by Paul Halsall, 2006, <http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/johndamascus-komesis.html>.
  17. Johnson, Robert A. Owning Your Own Shadow. San Francisco: HarperCollins, 1993.
  18. Joines, Karen Randolph. Serpent Symbolism in the Old Testament. Haddonfield, NJ: Haddonfield House, 1974.
  19. Jung, Carl. Collected Works, Vol. 9, pt. 1, 2nd ed., translated by R. F.C. Hull. Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1968.
  20. _____, ed. Man and His Symbols. New York: Doubleday, 1964.
  21. _____. Memories, Dreams, Reflections, edited by Aniela Jaffe, translated by Clara Winston. New York: Vintage, 1989.
  22. Jung, Emma and M-L. von Franz. The Grail Legend, translated by Andrea Dykes. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1970.
  23. Jurich, Marilyn. Scheherazade’s Sisters: Trickster Heroines and Their Stories in World Literature. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1998.
  24. Kabbala Denudata: The Kabbalah Unveiled, translated by S.L. MacGregor Mathers. New York: Theosophical Pub. Co., 1912. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/jud/tku>.
  25. Kalakaua, King David. The Legends and Myths of Hawaii. Rutland: Charles E. Tuttle, 1972.
  26. Kalevala, translated by K. Bosley. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989.
  27. Kalidasa. “Sakuntala and the Ring of Recollection,” in The Longman Anthology of World Literature, Vol. A, The Ancient World. New York: Pearson Education, 2004.
  1. Kanta, Katherine G. Eleusis, translated by W.W. Phelps. Athens: Traveler’s, 1979.
  2. Kerenyi, Karl. Eleusis: An Archetypal Image of Mother and Daughter, translated by Ralph Manheim. New York: Schocken, 1977.
  3. Kinsley, David. The Goddesses’ Mirror: Visions of the Divine from East and West. New York: State University of New York Press, 1989.
  4. _____. Hindu Goddesses: Visions of the Divine Feminine. India: Motilal Banarsidass, 1987.
  5. Kluckhohn, Clyde, and Dorothea Leighton. The Navaho. New York: Doubleday, 1962.
  6. Kojiki: Record of Ancient Matters, translated by Basil Hall Chamberlain. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle, 1981.
  7. Kolbenschlag, Madonna. Kiss Sleeping Beauty Goodbye. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1979.
  8. Kramer, Samuel Noah. “The Weeping Goddess: Sumerian Prototypes of the Mater Dolorosa.” The Biblical Archeologist 46, no. 2 (Spring 1983): 69–80. JSTOR, <http://www.Jstor.org/stable/3209643>.
  9. Lang, Andrew. The Yellow Fairy Book, edited by Brian Alderson. New York: Viking, 1980.
  10. Lao, Meri. Seduction and the Secret Power of Women: The Lure of Sirens and Mermaids, translated by John Oliphant. Rochester, VT: Park Street, 1998.
  11. Larrington, Carolyne, ed. The Feminist Companion to Mytholog y. Great Britain: Pandora, 1992.
  12. Le Guin, Ursula K. “The Space Crone.” CoEvolution Quarterly (Summer 1976): 108–110.
  13. Leavy, Barbara Fass. In Search of the Swan Maiden. New York: New York University Press, 1994.
  14. Lederer, Wolfgang. The Fear of Women. New York: Grune & Stratton,1968.
  15. Leloup, Jean-Yves. The Sacred Embrace of Jesus and Mary, translated by Joseph Rowe. Rochester, VT: Inner Traditions, 2005.
  16. León, Vicki. Outrageous Women of Ancient Times. New York: John Wiley, 1998.
  17. _____. Uppity Women of Ancient Times. Berkeley: Conari, 1995.
  18. Lewis, Katherine J., ed. Young Medieval Woman. Great Britain: Saint Martin’s, 1999.
  19. Lurie, Nancy Oestreich. “Winnebago Berdache.” American Anthropologist 55, no. 1 (1953): 708–712.
  20. Luthi, Max. Once Upon a Time: On the Nature of Fairy Tales, translated by Lee Chadeayne and Paul Gottwald. New York: Fredrick Ungar, 1970.
  21. Lyons, Heather. “Some Second Thoughts on Sexism in Fairy Tales,” in Literature and Learning, edited by Elizabeth Grugeon and Peter Waldon, 42–59. London: Open University Press, 1978.
  22. The Mabinogion, edited and translated by Lady Charlotte Guest. London: Bernard Quaritch, 1877. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/mab/index.htm>.
  23. MacCulloch, John Arnott. The Religion of the Ancient Celts. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1911. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/rac/index.htm>.
  24. MacDonald, Margaret Read. The Storyteller’s Sourcebook. Detroit, MI: Neal-Schuman, 1982.
  25. Malamud, René. “The Amazon Problem,” translated by Murray Stein, in Facing the Gods, edited by James Hillman, 47–66. Irving, Texas: Spring Publications, 1980.
  26. Markale, Jean. Women of the Celts. Rochester, VT: Inner Traditions, 1986.
  27. McDermott, LeRoy. “Self-Representation in Upper Paleolithic Female Figures.” Current Anthropology 37 April (1996): 2.
  28. Megas, Georgios A., ed. Folktales of Greece, translated by Helen Colaclides. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1970.
  29. Meyerhof, Barbara. “The Older Woman as Androgyne.” Parabola 3, no. 4 (1978): 75–89.
  30. Minard, Rosemary. Womenfolk and Fairy Tales. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1975.
  31. Monaghan, Patricia. The Book of Goddesses and Heroines. New York: Dutton, 1981.
  32. Murdock, Maureen. The Heroine’s Journey. Boston: Shambhala, 1990.
  33. Nelson, Gertrud Mueller. Here All Dwell Free: Stories to Heal the Wounded Feminine. New York: Doubleday, 1991.
  34. Neumann, Erich. Amor and Psyche: The Psychic Development of the Feminine. Bollingen Series 54, translated by Ralph Manheim. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1956.
  35. _____. The Great Mother, translated by Ralph Manheim. Whitefish, MT: Kessinger, 2004.
  36. Nibelungenlied, translated by A.T. Hatto. Baltimore: Penguin, 1965.
  37. Nihongi: Chronicles of Japan from the Earliest Times to A.D. 697, translated by W.G. Aston. London: George Allen & Unwin, 1956.
  38. Noble, Vicki. “The Dark Goddess: Remembering the Sacred.” Woman of Power 1, no. 12 (Winter 1989).
  39. _____. “Female Blood Roots of Shamanism.” Shaman’s Drum 1, no. 4 (Spring 1986): 15–20.
  40. Norman, Howard. Northern Tales: Traditional Stories of Eskimo and Indian People. New York, Pantheon, 1990.
  41. Olds, Linda E. “The Neglected Feminine: Promises and Perils.” Soundings: An Interdisciplinary Journal 69, no. 3 (1986): 226–40.
  42. Olson, Carol. The Book of the Goddess Past and Present. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland, 2002.
  43. O’Sullivan, Sean, ed. and trans. Folktales of Ireland. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1966.
  44. Ovid. Metamorphoses, edited by E.J. Kenney, translated by A.D. Melville. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 1987.
  45. _____. Metamorphoses., translated by Brookes More. Boston: Cornhill, 1922. The Theoi Project, <http://www.theoi.com/Text/OvidMetamorphoses1.htm>
  1. Paradiz, Valerie. Clever Maids: The Secret History of the Grimm Fairy Tales. New York: Basic, 2005.
  2. Pausanias. Description of Greece, translated by W.H.S. Jones, D. Litt, and H.A. Ormerod. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1918.
  3. Pavry, Bapsy. The Heroines of Ancient Persia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1930.
  4. Perera, Silvia Brinton. Descent to the Goddess. Toronto: Inner City, 1981.
  5. Phelps, Ethel Johnston. The Maid of the North: Feminist Folk Tales from Around the World. New York: Holt, Rhinehart, and Winston, 1981.
  6. Pilinovsky, Helen. “Donkeyskin, Deerskin, Allerleirauh: The Reality of the Fairy Tale.” The Journal of Mythic Arts. The Endicott Studio, 2001, <http://www.endicott-studio.com/fordnky.html>.
  7. Pinsky, Mark I. The Gospel According to Disney. Louisville: Westminster, 2004.
  8. The Poetic Edda, translated by Henry Adams Bellows. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1936. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe00.htm>.
  9. Pogany, Willy. The Hungarian Fairy Book. New York: Frederick A. Stokes, 1913.
  10. Poignant, Roslyn. Oceanic Mytholog y. New York: Hamlyn, 1967.
  11. Pope, Deborah. A Separate Vision: Isolation in Contemporary Women’s Poetry. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1984.
  12. Popol Vuh, trans. Dennis Tedlock. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996.
  13. Potter, Tristram. The Female Hero in Folklore and Legend. New York: Seabury Press, 1975.
  14. Prioleau, Elizabeth. Seductress: Women Who Ravished the World and Their Lost Art of Love. New York: Penguin Group, 2004.
  15. Ragan, Kathleen. Fearless Girls, Wise Women, and Beloved Sisters. New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.
  16. Ramanujan, A.K., ed. Folktales from India: A Selection of Oral Tales from Twenty-two Languages. New York: Pantheon, 1991.
  17. Ramayana, edited and translated by William Buck. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1976.
  18. Reed, A.W. Treasury of Maori Folklore. New South Wales: Literary Productions, 1967.
  19. Reis, Patricia. “The Dark Goddess.” Woman of Power 1, no. 8, (Winter 1988): 24–27, 82.
  20. _____. Through the Goddess: A Woman’s Way of Healing. New York: Continuum, 1991.
  21. Rich, Adrienne. Of Woman Born: Motherhood as Experience and Institution. New York: Norton, 1976.
  22. Rowe, Karen E. “Feminism and Fairytales.” Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 6 (1979): 237–257.
  23. Ruether, Rosemary Radford. Goddesses and the Divine Feminine. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005.
  24. _____. Religion and Sexism. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1974.
  25. _____. “Sexism and God-talk,” in Women & Men: The Consequences of Power. Selected Papers from the Bicentennial Conference “Pioneers for Century III,” April 1976, Cincinnati, Ohio.
  26. Rush, Barbara. The Book of Jewish Women’s Tales. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.
  27. Sastri, Haragovinda, ed. Manusmrtih. Varanasi: Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series, 1965.
  28. Sale, Roger. Fairy Tales and After. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1978.
  29. San Souci, Robert D. Cut from the Same Cloth: American Women of Myth, Legend, and Tall Tale. New York: Philomel, 1993.
  30. Schaefer, Carol. Grandmothers Counsel the World. Boston: Trumpeter, 2006.
  31. Schultz, George F. Vietnamese Legends. Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle, 1965.
  32. Schwartz, Howard, ed. Lilith’s Cave: Jewish Tales of the Supernatural. San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1988.
  33. Shakespeare, William. All’s Well That Ends Well, in The Riverside Shakespeare, 2nd ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.
  34. _____. Antony and Cleopatra, in The Riverside Shakespeare, 2nd ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.
  35. Sharma, Arvind, and Katherine K. Young, eds. Feminism and World Religions. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1999.
  36. Smyrnaeus, Quintus. The Fall of Troy, translated by Arthur S. Way. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1913. Loeb Classical Library, <http://www.archive.org/stream/falloftroy00quin/falloftroy00quin_djvu.txt>.
  37. Sophocles. Antigone. The Oedipus Trilogy, translated by F. Storr. 2006. EBook #31. <http//www.gutenberg.org/files /31/31-h/31-h.htm#antigone>. 
  38. Spencer, Krishanna. “Priestess Path: Under the Aegis of Athena.” The Beltane Papers 2 (Autumn 2002): 24.
  39. Spencer, W.J., and F.J. Gillen. The Northern Tribes of Central Australia. London: Macmillan, 1904.
  40. Spretnak, Charlene. Lost Goddesses of Early Greece: A Collection of Pre-Hellenic Myths. Boston: Beacon, 1992.
  41. Starhawk, and Hilary Valentine. The Twelve Wild Swans. San Francisco: HarperCollins, 2000.
  42. Stephens, Autumn. Wild Women: Crusaders, Curmudgeons and Completely Corsetless Ladies in the Otherwise Virtuous Victorian Era. Berkeley, CA: Conari, 1992.
  43. Stevenson, Pamela S. “Wolff ’s Four Forms of the Feminine Psyche: Toward a Clinical Application.” Ph.D. diss., University of California-Berkeley, 1983.
  44. Stone, Kay F. “Things Walt Disney Never Told Us.” Journal of American Folklore 88 (1975): 42–50.
  45. Stone, Merlin. Ancient Mirrors of Womanhood. Boston: Beacon Press, 1990.
  46. _____. When God Was a Woman. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1976.
  47. Sturluson, Snorri. The Prose Edda, translated by Arthur Gilchrist Brodeur. New York: The American Scandinavian Foundation, 1916. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/pre>.
  48. Swidler, Arlene, ed. Homosexuality and World Religions. Valley Forge, PA: Trinity Press International, 1993.
  49. Tacitus. Germania, translated by A.J. Church and W.J. Brodribb. London: Macmillan, 1877. The Internet Medieval Sourcebook, <http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/source/tacitus1.html>.
  50. Tatar, Maria M. The Annotated Classic Fairy Tales. New York and London: W.W. Norton, 2002.
  51. _____. The Hard Facts of the Grimms’ Fairy Tales. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987.
  52. _____. Off with Their Heads! Fairy Tales and the Culture of Childhood. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992.
  53. Taylor, Thomas. The Eleusinian and Bacchic Mysteries, edited by Alexander Wilder. New York: J.W. Bouton, 1891. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/ebm/ebm00.htm>.
  54. Tchana, Katrin Hyman. Changing Woman and Her Sisters. New York: Holiday House, 2006.
  55. Theatana, Kathryn. “Priestess of Hecate.” Woman of Power 1, no. 8 (Winter 1988): 35–37.
  56. Thomas, Ann G. The Women We Become: Myths, Folktales, and Stories about Growing Older. Rocklin, CA: Prima, 1997.
  57. “Thomas Rhymer: Child 39C,” no. 3. The Ancient and Modern Scots Songs, 1769, 300. Tam Lin Balladry, <http://www.tam-lin.org/versions/39C.html>.
  58. Thomas, William, and Kate Pavitt. The Book of Talismans, Amulets and Zodiacal Gems. London: William Rider & Son, 1922. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacredtexts.com/sym/bot/index.htm>.
  59. Trask, Haunami-Kay. Eros and Power: The Promise of Feminist Theory. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1986.
  60. Trial of Joan of Arc, translated by W.S. Scott. London: Associated Book Sellers, 1956.
  61. Vigil, Angel. The Corn Woman: Stories and Legends of the Hispanic Southwest. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, 1994.
  62. Vivante, Bella, ed. Women’s Roles in Ancient Civilizations. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1999.
  63. Von Franz, Marie-Louise. Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion. New York: Wildman, 1983.
  64. _____. The Feminine in Fairy Tales. Boston: Shambhala, 2001.
  65. _____. The Grail Legend, translated by Andrea Dykes. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1970.
  66. _____. Individuation in Fairy Tales. Boston: Shambhala, 1990.
  67. Vyasa, Krishna-Dwaipayana. The Mahabharata, translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli. Columbia, MO: South Asia Books, 2004.
  68. Waelti-Walters, Jennifer R. Fairy Tales and the Female Imagination. Montreal. Canada: Eden, 1982.
  69. Wagner, Richard. The Ring of the Nibelung: Siegfried & The Twilight of the Gods, translated by Margaret Armour. New York: Abaris Books, 1910. The Internet Sacred Text Archive, <http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/ron/index.htm>.
  70. Walker, Barbara G. “Witches Past and Present.” Freethought Today 25, no. 8 (Oct 2008): 6–7.
  71. _____. The Woman’s Dictionary of Symbols and Sacred Objects. San Francisco: HarperSanFrancisco, 1988.
  72. Warner, Maria. From the Beast to the Blonde. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1994.
  73. Weston, Jessie L. From Ritual to Romance. New York: Peter Smith, 1941.
  74. Williams, Walter L. The Spirit and the Flesh: Sexual Diversity in American Indian Culture. Boston: Beacon, 1986.
  75. Williams-Ellis, Annabel. British Fairy Tales. Glasgow and London: Blackie and Son, 1976.
  76. Windling, Terri, ed. The Armless Maiden and Other Tales for Childhood’s Survivors. New York: Tor Books, 1996.
  77. _____. “Ashes, Blood, and the Slipper of Glass.” The Journal of Mythic Arts, The Endicott Studio (Summer 2007), <http://www.endicottstudio.com/rdm/forashs>
  1. _____. “Beauty and the Beast.” The Journal of Mythic Arts, The Endicott Studio (Summer 2007), <http://www.endicott-studio.com/rdrm/forbewty.html>.
  2. _____. “Married to Magic: Animal Brides and Bridegrooms.” The Journal of Mythic Arts, The Endicott Studio (Summer 2004), <http://www.endicott-studio.com/rdrm/rrMarriedToMagic.html>.
  3. Wolff, Toni. Structural Forms of the Feminine Psyche, translated by P. Watzlawik. Zurich: Students Association, C.G. Jung Institute, 1956.
  4. Woodman, Marion. The Pregnant Virgin: A Process of Psychological Transformation. Toronto: Inner City Books, 1985.
  5. _____. The Ravaged Bridegroom: Masculinity in Women. Toronto: Inner City Books, 1990.
  6. Wylde, Isabella. “Women Who Run with the Wolves: An Interview with Author and Analyst Clarissa Pinkola Estés.” Radiance (Winter 1994), <http://radiancemagazine.com/issues/1994/wolves.html>.
  7. Zheleznova, Irina, ed. and trans. Folk Tales from Russian Lands. New York: Dover, 1969.
  8. Zipes, Jack. The Brothers Grimm: From Enchanted Forests to the Modern World. New York: Routledge,
  9. Chapman and Hall, 1988.
  10. _____. When Dreams Came True: Classical Fairy Tales and Their Tradition. New York: Routledge, 2007.
  11. Zolbrod, Paul G. Diné bahané: The Navaho Creation Story. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1984.

 

Websites

  1. The CELT Project: Corpus of Electronic Texts http://www.ucc.ie/celt
  2. Endicott Studio of Mythic Arts and Journal of Mythic Arts http://www.endicott-studio.com/
  3. Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html
  4. The Internet Classic Archive http://classics.mit.edu/
  5. The Internet Medieval Sourcebook http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.html
  6. The Internet Sacred Text Archive http://www.sacred-texts.com/
  7. The Internet Women’s History Sourcebook http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/women/womensbook.html
  8. The Perseus Digital Library Project http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/
  9. Project Gutenberg http://www.gutenberg.org
  10. SurLaLune Fairytales http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/
  11. The Theoi Project http://www.theoi.com/

 

For these and additional resources on myth and the heroine, please visit the author’s website at http://heroine.calithwain.com